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#1 2007-04-13 15:19:50

Terry Tozer
Moderator
Registered: 2007-04-05

Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

“Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate” is a thrilling ride on the flight deck of several airliners that experience rather more excitement than either the crew or passengers hoped for. In some cases these flights end in tragedy, others not. All are real and taken from official reports or direct experience. The example referred to below is from the author’s personal experience and will leave the reader breathless.

Reviewers wrote.

"I have read several chapters and I think that it is a remarkable book, I think it is very well written and with a great sense of narrative pace...........The fact that most of the claims are based in real stories, makes the book all the most interesting.
To tell you the truth, when I begun reading I thought I would browse some chapters to see the general tone and interest. But after beginning I couldn't stop reading, and that's something that doesn't happen very often, when you have dozens of manuscripts waiting on your desk. The truth is that the subject is troubling for many readers because they have to confront a big fear, a suppressed fear that emerges again when you know more. And that is something that one experiences as a reader of the book. "


"I have just been reading the extract from Terry
T's book. I know nothing about flying but his direct, uncluttered prose and
ability to pile on the tension brought me to the edge of my computer chair.
I gasped with relief when he exploded the tension. Is the book to be
published soon?"


The answer to that question is that it will be available later this year. For more information please click on E Mail. or visit the author's website at http://www.terrytozer.co.uk

http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w279/TerryT_photo/erj145_06.jpg

Embaer 145 regional jet.

See Earlyworks Press  under Non-Fiction, for a sample from the book and more pictures, .

About the Author

Terry flirted with motor racing in the 1960s and 1970s, before working with Peter Berthon and Raymond Mays (creators of ERA and BRM racing cars) in their attempt to win the contract to build a Formula One engine for the Ford Motor Company.
In 1980 he started a business importing wood burning stoves, it was sold in 1984 and continues today.

He obtained his private pilot’s licence in 1979 qualifying as an instructor in 1982. His Airline Transport Pilot licence followed in 1985.
Following various adventures in Africa, Terry worked as a coastguard/shipping patrol pilot, air taxi and air ambulance pilot in the UK and Europe, before joining the airline world.

Airline jobs include London City Airways in London’s docklands flying the De Havilland Dash 7, then with Heavylift Cargo Airlines flying the giant Shorts Belfast SH5, on global cargo charters, including desert operations in Gulf War 1.

Finally he flew the Embraer145 regional jet, for Brymon Airways and British Airways Citi Express.

Terry was involved in trade union activity as the Chairman of the BALPA Council. This involved in negotiations with management at all levels – including Sir Rod Eddington, then Chief Executive of BA – and dealings with EU and US pilot unions
He is uniquely informed and connected in the world of aviation.



http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w279/TerryT_photo/ShortsBelfastonApp1.jpg

The Shorts Belfast of Heavylift Cargo Airlines as flown by the author.

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#2 2007-06-27 15:53:09

corinnetwining
Member
Registered: 2007-06-27

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

Wow!  If that had been a book, I couldn't have put it down - I was glued to the computer!!  So how do I get to read the rest?  Really, really good. Corinne.

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#3 2007-06-27 18:00:50

Judy Maben
Member
Registered: 2007-06-27

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

I just spent the better part of my lunch hour reading your excerpt…what a good writer you are, Terry! I was completely hooked. Now I need to read the rest...when will the book be published? Hopefully before my next airline flight! Judy.

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#4 2007-06-28 12:26:44

Hamilcar
Member
Registered: 2007-06-28

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

I've just finished reading the first part of Captain Tozer's book.  As intro's to a sticky subject go, this has to be good.  A canny oblique way of putting the pilot into context and introducing subjects to return to.  It's a tantalizing fragment.  I have been flying airliners for 41 years, including, I suspect, the one he was flying in the simulator.  I am really pleased to find a book which is going to represent all our concerns.  May I ask, please, are those of us in the industry invited to contact him with our own experiences and submissions?

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#5 2007-06-28 15:40:27

Terry Tozer
Moderator
Registered: 2007-04-05

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

Thank you all for all your kind words. It is most gratifying to know I may have hit the spot.

Hamilcar, yes please do contact me, there is an email link on the above page. I look forward to hearing from you.

For those asking about a publishing date, it will be available later this year. Keep an eye on this page for updates and more details.

TT

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#6 2007-06-29 15:20:30

Kay Green
Admin
From: Hastings, UK
Registered: 2007-04-03
Website

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

I caught a part of your interview on pilot fatique on Radio 5 Live, Terry. Very interesting for us as my partner works very strange shifts to surreal effect sometimes.  Is it possible to hear a recorded version somewhere? I was brought up short by the comparision with the 'dead man's handle' on trains (it's okay, if the pilot dies the plane will stop - eek!)

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#7 2007-07-02 22:34:54

Terry Tozer
Moderator
Registered: 2007-04-05

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

Thank you Kay but don't panic. Aircraft do not have a dead man's handle.

Someone had called into the program poo pooing the idea of pilots being fatigued. He was a train driver who said he worked shifts and that it was, "exactly the same for him." Much of the discussion had been about pilots falling asleep, sometimes both of them.

I suggested that whilst a train driver's job was also demanding it was not a fair comparison for many reasons but primarily the 3d dimension that pilots deal with. I said that a train was on the earth's surface and so if the driver fell asleep the train would just stop.

I think that maybe you transposed the two means of transport. My point is that fatigue IS an important issue and you cannot stop the aircraft, obviously.

As for a link, I'm not sure of the Beeb allows that but last Monday's program is still there at the moment. BBC Radio Five Live, programs, Anita Anand and Mon. 1 hour 20 into the program, so fast forward via the 15 minute ffwd button a few times & you're there, but I don't know for how long.

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#8 2007-07-02 22:38:36

Kay Green
Admin
From: Hastings, UK
Registered: 2007-04-03
Website

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

thanks Terry, will do. I didn't really think it was the same as trains but I missed that bit due to losing the connection to the programme - that's why I wanted the link!

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#9 2007-08-09 14:11:22

Terry Tozer
Moderator
Registered: 2007-04-05

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

If anybody is interested, I'm doing a radio interview on Radio 5 live this evening at 1740 on the subject of air traffic control, "level busts," why have pilot infringements of their cleared level doubled since 2003?

we may also touch on the subject of my last BBC interview, which was pilot fatigue.

8/8/07

Terry T.

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#10 2007-08-09 14:15:56

Kay Green
Admin
From: Hastings, UK
Registered: 2007-04-03
Website

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

What's a level bust?

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#11 2007-08-09 14:43:33

Terry Tozer
Moderator
Registered: 2007-04-05

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

I think it's defined as a deviation from the assigned altitude by more than 300 feet. ATC clear you to climb or descend to say, 15000 feet and you go though it.

NATS the national air traffic service, say Level busts have doubled since 2003. Why? will be the question I expect. Find out in the next exciting installment on R5Live...............

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#12 2008-02-22 10:04:55

Terry Tozer
Moderator
Registered: 2007-04-05

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

Anybody with access to BBC Radio Scotland can hear me in discussion about the crash of BA038 at Heathrow in January.

1pm Friday 22 February 2008.

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#13 2008-08-22 16:44:37

Terry Tozer
Moderator
Registered: 2007-04-05

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

The Tragedy at Madrid Barajas, August 2008.


Wednesday's horrific plane crash in Madrid is a poignant reminder of why I wrote, "Cheap Flights - The True Cost."
I have the increasing feeling that this crash has its roots in the malaise that has been creeping into the airline industry for some time now.

Whilst the basic causes of this disaster are not yet known for sure the event took place against a background of cutthroat markets, low air fares, chaotic management, exhausted pilots and a bad atmosphere. Too many times innocent travelers have died as a result of this lethal cocktail, whilst regulators watch passively from the sidelines.

No plane crash is ever due to one simple thing and already fragments of information are building a familiar picture. If you are interested you can read more of my views on my website but for now I fear that we may find the Madrid disaster was a completely avoidable waste of human life.

I was interviewed on BBC TV and Radio news on the day of the accident and in prior discussion with the news team outlined my views and fears, yet when on air the interviewer failed to ask me anything related to my main concerns. Instead they wanted to know what I had already said I could not provide. Answers to unanswerable questions.

The person interviewed immediately after me on BBC News 24 was allegedly, "an aviation expert," who had clearly never flown an aircraft. He said that it was, "undoubtedly true that engine failure caused the crash." I doubt if the crash investigators know that even today and besides it is never that simple.

Pilots are frustrated at the poor information disseminated in the aftermath of this and other similar events but it seems instant gratification and a good story are more important than facts which the public can really use.

My hope is that my book will be published so that everyone can get the real inside story (I am sure this story is already in it in another form) but how sad that we need human misery on this scale before the issue gets any attention and even then does it really?

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#14 2008-08-22 17:39:51

Kay Green
Admin
From: Hastings, UK
Registered: 2007-04-03
Website

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

Tell your pilot friends your attempts to educate the rest of us are working, Terry. When the first 'expert' to appear on the BBC news came up with his description of how a burning engine would have caused the crash, I remembered your early chapters and had this feeling that he was talking out of an unorthodox part of himself. I've put it together with what our RDG said about television archaeology, and what my daughter (a music teacher) has screamed at the TV during talent shows with 'expert' judges - TV experts are NOT to be trusted!

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#15 2008-10-10 15:01:08

Terry Tozer
Moderator
Registered: 2007-04-05

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

Thanks Kay,

Good to have support for my views. In fact I did get the opportunity to point out the "expert's" confusion over the alleged facts to the Beeb the other day. The problem is that when an event happens the media are desperate to get a commentator & have a tendency to grab whoever's walking past at the time.

I suggested that given that accident investigators are professional pilots (even if they are also engineers) and that only pilots know what it is like to fly an aeroplane, then they should ensure that all experts they interview in such circumstances are pilots, I doubt if my suggestions will carry any weight however.

The whole purpose of my book is to take the reader along on some carefully explained flights - in the cockpit - so that they can then make their own judgments. I think it works.

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#16 2009-02-27 18:24:21

Kay Green
Admin
From: Hastings, UK
Registered: 2007-04-03
Website

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

Terry's on Simon Calder's Travel Clinic this Sunday. There's a link on his home page.

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#17 2010-10-18 17:17:11

Kay Green
Admin
From: Hastings, UK
Registered: 2007-04-03
Website

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

NB The Extract at Earlyworks Press has been moved as the book is currently under offer to a publisher.

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#18 2010-10-19 09:09:41

RDGardner
Moderator
From: West Lindsey
Registered: 2007-04-10

Re: Anatomy of an Air Crash - How culture decides your fate

Ooo, fingers crossed!

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