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#1 2010-07-07 12:58:53

RDGardner
Moderator
From: West Lindsey
Registered: 2007-04-10

PC versions of the classics, grr!

This isn't a recommendation, it's a rant, but this seems like the best place to have it. What in the name of Mary Poppins is this business of rewriting childrens' songs and rhymes to eliminate any hint of un-PC behaviour? I'm not talking here about expressions that have become deeply offensive over the lifetime of a classic book - in fact, I'd quite welcome an edition of the Just So Stories that had quietly expunged a certain word in 'How The Leopard Got His Spots' which I always replace with 'human being' - but about 'There were ten in the bed...' and 'The Little Red Hen'! Seriously, I have a lovely board book that illustrates 'There were ten in the bed...' with a row of teddy bears, but at the end of the song, where the little one should say "Good night! Good night!" because he's now got the whole bed to himself, the little one actually says "I'm lonely!" and all the other nine teddy bears get back in again. It doesn't scan, it doesn't make sense and it isn't right! Then I found a copy of 'The Little Red Hen' in a bookshop where somebody had obviously thought that after all her hard work making the cake, it still looked mean and greedy, and probably condoning childhood obesity, for the Little Red Hen to eat all the cake herself, so instead of "No, I shall eat it myself!" they had her say "No, I have some better friends who are coming to eat it with me!" What makes me really spit bees here, though, is that they hadn't bothered to change the text on the next page to accommodate the new version. As you know, every time the Little Red Hen's friends refuse to help her, she says "Then I shall do it myself!" and the next line is 'And she did!' - then the punchline is '"No, I shall eat it myself!"... And she did!' The PC idiots have let the punchline stand, so it now reads '"I have some better friends who are coming to eat it with me!"... And she did!' How simple would it have been to change 'she' to 'they', and how ignorant, sloppy and thoroughly insulting to the intelligence of the nation's children is that? Fume, steam, fulminate...

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#2 2010-07-07 13:15:07

Kay Green
Admin
From: Hastings, UK
Registered: 2007-04-03
Website

Re: PC versions of the classics, grr!

Poor beezzzzz!

I agree though - you have to examine books very carefully before buying them. It's just too easy for clever ****s to interfere. I bought what was supposed to be a fantastic new illustrated version of some classical fairytales for my little people recently and they'd been savaged.

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#3 2010-07-07 13:26:04

RDGardner
Moderator
From: West Lindsey
Registered: 2007-04-10

Re: PC versions of the classics, grr!

I wouldn't mind if it were clever asterisks... it's the stupid ones who get on my biscuit...

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#4 2010-08-09 14:56:41

RDGardner
Moderator
From: West Lindsey
Registered: 2007-04-10

Re: PC versions of the classics, grr!

Have to say in fairness, though, the new version of 'The Gingerbread Man' in the Ladybird book I got free by saving up the baby-yoghurt pots is really rather good: it seems to have been rewritten by Carol Ann Duffy, 'cos it's got rhymes in the oddest places, but everything is repeated where it should be, and yes, the Gingerbread Man does get eaten in the end!

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#5 2010-09-10 09:34:59

RDGardner
Moderator
From: West Lindsey
Registered: 2007-04-10

Re: PC versions of the classics, grr!

See review in the other section, headed 'Little Troubleblossom recommends story books'...

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#6 2011-01-12 13:33:49

RDGardner
Moderator
From: West Lindsey
Registered: 2007-04-10

Re: PC versions of the classics, grr!

Oh, I think I've just come on the PC revision of all time in the new compendium of nursery rhymes Grandma got for the little one, which shows Old King Cole leading his fiddlers three in a conga line through the palace while playing the bagpipes, while a bowl of steaming porridge lies on the floor nearby. As interpretations of 'He called for his pipe and he called for his bowl...' go, this is so improbable that I can only assume the artist has been forbidden from illustrating the use of tobacco or alcohol!

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