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#1 2010-12-17 14:09:28

Kay Green
Admin
From: Hastings, UK
Registered: 2007-04-03
Website

Freedom of Information

AKA Publish and be slammed in solitary

I've just watched Julian Assange's press interview on the BBC news and noted something along the lines of, he thought he had his vocal supporters to thank for the legitimate (if harsh) treatment he'd received at the hands of British law. My next thought was that, although I've been ranting and raving about publishers' right to pass on information, I've done most of the ranting in private forums and in my living room so, having just heard from the horse's mouth that it's a real aid to the safety and liberty of publishers, here's the public rant...

As far as I'm aware, no-one anywhere has proved that Mr Assange is guilty of any crime. What he did was head an organisation that publishes any information it receives that it considers right and proper to publish. If that's a criminal offence, we're all in serious trouble and yet large organisations, government and otherwise, have been doing their best to shoot him down, some calling for a death penalty - on what charge I'm not sure.

In the same press release, he called The Guardian newspaper 'our media partners'. I am well aware that The Guardian has given extensive space to the Wikileaks information and the people who have provided it. I don't seem to have bought a copy today, but I'm off to do so now. As far as I know, no banks or governments have made it impossible to pay for The Guardian yet, despite it covering a lot of the same stories as the much-persecuted Wikileaks website.

If you can't find a bank that'll let you drop a contribution to Wikileaks this week, I suggest you do the next best thing and go out and buy a Guardian - oh, what the heck, buy two!

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